Just 6 minutes

How long does it take you to...

.

Grab a morning coffee?

minutes

How long does it take you to...

.

Pick up your dry cleaning?

minutes

How long does it take you to...

.

Do shopping?

minutes

How long does it take you to...

.

Go out to brunch with friends?

minutes

You answered 4 minutes

.

In less than five minutes, a dog left in a hot car can suffer symptoms of heat distress. These include panting, overheating and red gums.

This timeframe is an estimate based on the effects of extreme environmental factors in predisposed animals.

You answered 4 minutes

.

In [insert text entry answer] minutes, the temperature in your car could reach 60 °C on a hot day. This is over 10° hotter than a safe hot bath. Your dog is under heat stress and may start breathing up to 18 times faster than normal as he attempts to reduce his body temperature. Within 10 minutes, his skin can be hot enough to start causing burns.

This timeframe is an estimate based on the effects of extreme environmental factors in predisposed animals.

You answered 10 minutes

.

After [insert text entry answer] minutes, your dog may already be suffering from heat stress. His body temperature could already be at a level that causes fatal irreparable internal injuries.

This timeframe is an estimate based on the effects of extreme environmental factors in predisposed animals.

You answered 20 minutes

.

After [insert text entry answer] minutes, your dog could be displaying severe signs of heat stroke. These symptoms include excessive salivating, vomiting, diarrhoea, and disorientation.

This timeframe is an estimate based on the effects of extreme environmental factors in predisposed animals.

You answered 40 minutes

.

After [insert text entry answer] minutes, your dog could be in serious danger. Every minute more that your dog spends in the heat worsens his symptoms, prolongs his suffering and decreases his chance of survival. By now, your dog may begin convulsing and suffer internal haemorrhages and organ failure. His death can occur quickly or may follow hours — or up to 1-2 days —later, even after being removed from a hot car.

This timeframe is an estimate based on the effects of extreme environmental factors in predisposed animals.

Make Your Pledge

I pledge to never leave my dog unattended in a car.

* We have requested your email to keep you up to date on the results of this campaign and the work of the RSPCA. See below for privacy statement.

Thank you for your pledge

Thank You

Now let's amplify this message with the power of the crowd.

Click below to tell your friends and followers to never leave their dogs in hot cars.

  • Spread the message on Twitter
  • Spread the message on Facebook

DOGS DIE IN HOT CARS

Do not leave your dog in a vehicle. Pets can overheat even when the windows are down or the car is in the shade.

How fast does the temperature rise in a car?

Temperatures in a car can rise to dangerous levels and can rapidly reach more than double the outside temperature even on mild days. Tinting, parking in the shade or leaving the windows open do not help to reduce the inside temperature significantly.

Symptoms of heat stress

Dogs suffering from heat stress may pant, drool and become restless. Over time, they become weak and the colour of their gums may change; they may also start to stagger and experience vomiting, diarrhoea or seizures.

Vet treatment is essential

Heat stroke is an emergency. Given the seriousness of this condition, it is better to be safe than sorry and have your dog checked out by a vet.

Some dogs may suffer more than others

Dogs with short faces (such as pugs and bulldogs) can suffer in the heat because they find it difficult to breath. Obese and aged dogs are also at greater risk, as are those with heart disease and thick coats.

Emergency treatment at home

Emergency treatment at home should aim to bring the body temperature down at a steady rate; spray cool water onto your dog’s body and use a fan. You can also help by applying rubbing alcohol or water to the armpits, foot pads and groin. Don’t use ice or ice-cold water, as this may cool your dog down too rapidly.

Ute trays can burn

Dogs travelling on the back of utes can burn their footpads or bodies on the tray as these can get very hot in the sun. If you own a ute you should cover the trays with a suitable material and provide a shaded area.

Severe penalties apply

Causing animals to suffer in any way is a criminal offence. If your dog suffers as a result of being left in a car, you can be fined and spend time in jail.

If you see a dog suffering in a hot car, contact your local RSPCA immediately.

Please note: The timeframe in which an animal starts to feel the effects of overheating will vary depending on a number of factors including weather conditions, temperature within the car, ventilation, hydration, acclimatisation, and exposure to direct sunlight. Overheating may occur more rapidly in predisposed breeds, elderly animals, and those who suffer from medical conditions.